Tag Archives: SQL Server

Speaking at SQLSaturday Oslo, September 2nd 2017

I got some great new during my vacation I got a mail saying I was selected to give a talk at SQLSaturday in Oslo this year. I also got notified by the tweet below which I had completely forgotten from last year. Nice surprise to see I have succesfully made a goal of mine, even though I had forgotten I had set it! I’ve been to every SQLSaturday that has been in Oslo and it has always been a great event so looking forward to be able to contribute with a talk myself this year!

My talk is titled “Data Visualization – More Than a Hygiene Factor”, based on a quote from this Medium Post. You can read my abstract below.

"For many companies data visualization is still a hygiene factor; necessary but not crucial"

In a world where everyone wants to use data to drive their business forward it is important to be able to communicate and speak the language of data even though data itself can be complex. One way of doing this is by making good data visualisations. Good data visualisations are engaging, they are informative and they let your data tell you its story. Too often data visualisation gets a low priority making the final result feeling lacklustered and making the users uninspired. 

In this session we look at some data visualisation principles and best practices, in order to deliever your message with a clear point of view and minimize confusion. Lastly we will look at how you can use these practices with Power BI in order to improve how data can be communicated to your end users in the best possible way making them come back over and over.

SQLSaturday is a free 1-day training event for Microsoft Data Platform and SQL Server professionals, providing a variety of high-quality technical sessions. If you work on the Microsoft Data Platform SQLSaturday is a great way to get inspired and hear about new things. You can find more information about SQLSaturday, September 2nd in Oslo here!

 

 

“The Little of Visualization design” – with Power BI

Andy Kirk¬†has an excellent series called “The Little of Visualization Design” where he gives small tips and tricks that can improve your data visualizations. If you have not seen it I strongly recommend it. Now, what I am going to try and do every week after summer vacation is to try and show you have you can take these tricks and use them with Power BI. But let’s kick start it now¬†with part 1, dual labeling. I ¬†suggest¬†that you read the original post by Andy first so we are at a common ground about what we are going to look at which is this pie chart.

Dual labeling. It is suprisingly normal to see and it generates more cluster on your data visualisation than you need. Repeating something will not make things clearer, it will just create more ink on your graph and make it harder to focus on what’s important.

Now if you punch in the data and create a pie chart in Power BI we get what is shown below.

So Power BI does not provide you with a dual labeling issue at front, but it is quite easy to reproduce it with Power BI.¬†In the “Format” pane you have a bunch of options which usually are great, but you have to use it with care and have a clear vision of why you are changing the original chart if not you can end up with all of these different variations.

The one in the bottom left is probably the closest to the one in the original post. It has dual labeling, and it has quite similar colors on the pie slices. Andy Kirk’s proposed solution is to remove the labeling and provide it directly onto the pie since the colors in the original graph is so similar. Now, that doesn’t ¬†sound to far away from the default graph that Power BI provides us with. However the default is not perfect and here is what I would do in order to improve it:

  1. In Label Style¬†choose “Category, data value”. This makes us see the actual number.
  2. Increase font size of detail label.
  3. Increase font size of the title. In general I think all default font sizes in Power BI are too small.¬†I always feel like I need stronger contact lenses¬†when creating a chart…
  4. Sort the chart by value so the slices appear in order of size.
    Note: I had originally made the font size of the detail label a bit bigger. However, this made the detail label for Canada disappear. Probably because it would take up the same space as Israel. So I wish they could make the position of the label a bit more dynamic.

In the end we end up with¬†the chart below. So all in all the default chart Power BI created wasn’t too bad, but it could be improved. And make sure you are aware that not all options in the format pane in Power BI makes your data visualisation better, it could make it worse!

I’m looking forward to some weeks of summer and then I’ll continue this series when I am back! Thanks for reading. If you have any questions or feedback drop me a comment, it is greatly appreciated.

Creating a dynamic card with text value in Power BI

Alternative title: Finding string value from a dimension with highest numeric value

The company i work for uses Yammer and I have founded a Data Visualization group which I am, manually, keeping some statistics about using Power BI. The other day I found myself wanting a dynamic card in Power BI in order to highlight which day was the most active when it came to amount of posts. In order to do this I had to figure out how to make a measure returning not the max value, but the day which had the maximum amount of posts. My usecase is finding a weekday, but maybe you want to see which product is the most popular, which county has the most purchases or which salesperson has the most sales. All these cases should be able to reuse this measure.

 

First try

My inital thought was to create a table in my calculation and then slice it to return only one row and one column leaving me with one cell which had the day with the most number of posts. I made a measure which used a TOPN returning the row with most posts followed by a SELECTCOLUMN to select only the column which had the weekday in it. Now, this turned out to return me the overall correct day, but it did not work when I added a filter and the POwer BI visualization returned errors so I had to start over.

 

The solution

I have created three measures to solve this.

1) One simple sum of [Number of Posts]:


Number of Posts = SUM(Sheet1[NumberOfPosts])

2) Finding the day with the most posts by using MAXX


MaxPostsPerWeekDay = MAXX(VALUES(Sheet1[WeekDay]);[Number of Posts])

3) Using FIRSTNONBLANK on my WeekDay column and then return the value where the sum equals the maximum value. So in the end my measure looks like this.

Most Popular Day = 
IF(
    ISBLANK([Number of Posts]);
    BLANK();
    FIRSTNONBLANK(
        Sheet1[WeekDay];
        IF(
            [Number of Posts] =
            CALCULATE(
                [MaxPostsPerWeekDay];
                VALUES(Sheet1[WeekDay])
            );
            1;
            BLANK()
        )
    )
)

The first IF is to remove days that has no posts, in my case there is not much activity in the weekends so they will get filtered out. The beauty of this measure is that it is not limited to crads, but also easy to use with your filters and in tables where you would want it.

Tracking myself in 2017

2017 is here and once again I’ll have a goal of writing here at least one time every month. Last year I failed this goal, but this year? Let’s give it another go.

I have a list of projects I want to do and I’ve finally started to track what I am doing every day. I’ve thought of this for a while as I think it would be interesting to see if I am able to find out if there are parameters in my life that affect things like my mood and evergy level. To do this tracking I’ve made a very simple website that is hosted in Azure with an Azure SQL Database behind to store my data. This was needed to make the registration as easy as possible. I had an Excel sheet the first couple of days before I got this site up and running, and I would not recommand that approach at all if you’re going to do the same. It is a too big effort to open an excel sheet every time you drink something or whatever you want to register. So far I am very happy with how it is working out, but I have started to get quite the backlog of increasing size with ideas for improvements. I have told myself to not change anything during January and then do an evalutation of how I think it is working out and which changes are absolutely needed. I’ve also decided not too look at any of the data until January is over. I don’t want to be too aware of what I am logging in the beginning, but rather try to make logging into somethig I just do and then when I have some months of data I can see if something sticks out from them.

So far I have split registration into two parts. First part is activities during the day. Things such as what I eat, drink, if I work out and for how long etc. The other part is a registration I do at the end of each day. Here I note down my mood, energy level, stress level and overall feeling as well as some small notes about f.ex if I hang out with friends during the day or did 100 math puzzles on an app I downloaded. As mentioned I am hoping to see if there is something that affects f.ex my mood and I am able to more actively apporach these things in the future. Not really sure if this will pop up, but at least I’ll have some more data on myself and what I do during the day.

Ever done something like this or have ideas of things that are worth noting down during the day? Let me know. I know some people take these kind of things to the extreme and I probably won’t do that, but I’m always interested in new input or ideas.

Note at the end: I really like how easy it is to create a web app in Azure and everytime I now do a push to my master branch in my Git reposit the website updates within seconds. Easy to set up a Visual Studio Team Services account and create the reposit to start working right away.

Activity registration